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The Ravin 500 is coming…….just hang onto your shorts.

Hanging on to my shorts so long feels like I am getting a wedgy!

And what about my R18? Atomic wedgy!
I honestly dont understand the desire to rush into the darkness.
I also dont understand the mentality that plays powerball with a 18 million to 1 chance of winning.

Takes all kinds they say.
I like seeing the new equipment come out. Gives me something to do until the next opening day.
I've been playiing the powerball this year too. I must be bored! lol
 
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I will never buy a first year of anything.
It has very little to with proper testing theres just no way you can test for 10,000 bows in the hands of a variety of different folks with differnt perceptions of thier skill level.
Companies likely use test shooter and a few other means maybe 10 bows (you guess the no.) maybe more.
In the end there a huge difference from the finding on those 10 bows and 10 folks.
 

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I believe the Ravin R500 delay is an arrow and nock issue. Existing Ravin arrows are no longer rated for the R500(note the new labeling). I have had a R500 on backorder for some time now, and shipping date continues to be pushed back. The new arrows for the R500 are called R500 arrows with part number R121, and do not show a weight. Just wondering if arrows are heavier causing arrows to fly slower rendering the 500 in R500 inaccurate?
 

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If Ravin had done a few things different, the crossbow would be on the market and a lot cheaper
than what they are asking.
My suggestions:
1)go to the arrow groove in the rail like normal crossbows which may cost a few feet per second.
2)they would not require the rollers at the front that unless maintained can cause problems.
3)using standard easy to obtain arrows that accept 1/2 moon nocks. I have tested 1/2 moon
nocks in a modified Barnett Ghost 410 shooting 535 feet per second with no problem.

Wishing you all the best when the crossbow arrives.
Take care.
 

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I'm just surprised that Scorpyd has still not removed the "second fastest crossbow" designator that they conceded to on their Aculeus page.
 

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If Ravin had done a few things different, the crossbow would be on the market and a lot cheaper
than what they are asking.
My suggestions:
1)go to the arrow groove in the rail like normal crossbows which may cost a few feet per second.
2)they would not require the rollers at the front that unless maintained can cause problems.
3)using standard easy to obtain arrows that accept 1/2 moon nocks. I have tested 1/2 moon
nocks in a modified Barnett Ghost 410 shooting 535 feet per second with no problem.

Wishing you all the best when the crossbow arrives.
Take care.
Do you have a thread on this bow? I am intrigued! What’s your center serving life like?
Thanks in advance!
Brian
 

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Here is some information on how I modified the Barnett Ghost 410
for test purposes only. Barnett 410's have the Carbonite riser which
has the problem of not accepting the twisting when cocking and shooting.
This crossbow has always been crank cocked when in a high quality rifle jig
which would reduce the twisting if having ones foot in the stirrup and possibly
on soft or uneven ground.
The riser has two large holes, one on each side which is another weak spot.
I plated and filled these holes in level with JB weld. To increase the speed I
installed a shorter bow string and cables from a Rocky Mountain crossbow
as well as advancing the cams. The Rocky Mountain crossbows (rebranded
Carbon Express) is manufactured in Taiwan. Other than the serving in the
arrow latch area not being installed tight enough, the string and cables were
the original and very high quality.
After various tests before, I decided to use this bow string and cables as a
test on the Barnett. The base serving had been removed previously and a
new serving added as tight as possible. Next on went a layer of BCY .030
as a second layer as tight as possible but approximately 1/2 inch narrower
on each side of the base layer. At the ends of all the servings, I add a wee
drop of Gorilla Glue as added insurance against separation.

Barnett Ghost 410 uses a Teflon strip in the "J" section (cable slide area).
That has been removed as: where it attaches is not level (beveled) and
the strip did not have enough sticky to keep it secure. With the Teflon, one had
to carefully putting quite a bit of pressure on the cables when installing the riser
or the Teflon strip would wrinkle.
In it's place, all my crossbow cables now are served in that area with BCY .030
serving which is very high quality. Lubrication is done with the Trident Silicone
Grease.
The limbs are all re enforced with high quality electrical tape, starting near the
cams and going to the end of the limb where it fits in the limb cap. The tape is
applied as tight as possible to prevent stretching.

As for wear, this bowstring which has been used on several crossbows, has
slightly over 11,000 shots and the last serving in the arrow latch area has just
over 5,000 shots.
The arrow used Is a cut down Barnett Head Hunter, cut to 10 1/4", 4" vanes,
206 grain shaft with 100 grain field point for a total weight of 306 grains. If I
remember correctly I used a 26 grain aluminum insert.

Since these tests, I have re installed the proper length bow string and cables
but still have the cams advanced a bit.

Several years ago I did a test using stock 60X string and cables with advanced
cams using the same arrow weight-point combination and achieved 509 feet per
second. This time with these other modifications made 535 feet per second.

I do a lot of target shooting, but am not into competition. Just testing crossbows
I have purchased, testing bow strings and cables, serving material and numerous
targets.
You may find some of the pictures I have submitted over time in the Barnett section.

Another recent upgrade is getting rid of the Barnett crank cocking device because it
is a poor fit and dangerous. I cut a + in the butt plate of the stock, re enforced the inside
of the stock to accept the crank cocking device that some Rocky Mountain crossbows
will accept. I had to swap out the hooks to use the Barnett sled due to a wider area near
the trigger housing. trying the hooks, I could not come back all the way and they would
bind. With care, I am able to decock the crossbow as well.
205509

Thanks for inquiring.
Take care.
 

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Here is some information on how I modified the Barnett Ghost 410
for test purposes only. Barnett 410's have the Carbonite riser which
has the problem of not accepting the twisting when cocking and shooting.
This crossbow has always been crank cocked when in a high quality rifle jig
which would reduce the twisting if having ones foot in the stirrup and possibly
on soft or uneven ground.
The riser has two large holes, one on each side which is another weak spot.
I plated and filled these holes in level with JB weld. To increase the speed I
installed a shorter bow string and cables from a Rocky Mountain crossbow
as well as advancing the cams. The Rocky Mountain crossbows (rebranded
Carbon Express) is manufactured in Taiwan. Other than the serving in the
arrow latch area not being installed tight enough, the string and cables were
the original and very high quality.
After various tests before, I decided to use this bow string and cables as a
test on the Barnett. The base serving had been removed previously and a
new serving added as tight as possible. Next on went a layer of BCY .030
as a second layer as tight as possible but approximately 1/2 inch narrower
on each side of the base layer. At the ends of all the servings, I add a wee
drop of Gorilla Glue as added insurance against separation.

Barnett Ghost 410 uses a Teflon strip in the "J" section (cable slide area).
That has been removed as: where it attaches is not level (beveled) and
the strip did not have enough sticky to keep it secure. With the Teflon, one had
to carefully putting quite a bit of pressure on the cables when installing the riser
or the Teflon strip would wrinkle.
In it's place, all my crossbow cables now are served in that area with BCY .030
serving which is very high quality. Lubrication is done with the Trident Silicone
Grease.
The limbs are all re enforced with high quality electrical tape, starting near the
cams and going to the end of the limb where it fits in the limb cap. The tape is
applied as tight as possible to prevent stretching.

As for wear, this bowstring which has been used on several crossbows, has
slightly over 11,000 shots and the last serving in the arrow latch area has just
over 5,000 shots.
The arrow used Is a cut down Barnett Head Hunter, cut to 10 1/4", 4" vanes,
206 grain shaft with 100 grain field point for a total weight of 306 grains. If I
remember correctly I used a 26 grain aluminum insert.

Since these tests, I have re installed the proper length bow string and cables
but still have the cams advanced a bit.

Several years ago I did a test using stock 60X string and cables with advanced
cams using the same arrow weight-point combination and achieved 509 feet per
second. This time with these other modifications made 535 feet per second.

I do a lot of target shooting, but am not into competition. Just testing crossbows
I have purchased, testing bow strings and cables, serving material and numerous
targets.
You may find some of the pictures I have submitted over time in the Barnett section.
Thanks for inquiring.
Take care.
Thank you! Is it loud when you shoot it?
 

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Thank you! Is it loud when you shoot it?
The more one advances the cams on a crossbow, the loader
it can get. I am slightly over the hundred decibels. Most of my
crossbows average 97 to 103, even as stock.
Target shooting especially in my shop, I always wear ear muffs
as they give better protection than ear plugs.

Normally I shoot the 20" Blood Sport Witness arrows that average
327 grain with out the 100 grain point. They are classed as weight
forward where the 20" use a 95 grain brass insert. The 22" weigh
the same but use a 77 grain brass insert. These arrows are manufactured
in China for Plano Synergy and are available at some Wal Marts and on Amazon.

If you did decide to use these arrows, pull the nock and use a 1/4" rod to knock the
insert out. The insert is fairly smooth and some are not glued too well. Shooting a
broad head into a target may leave the insert and broad head in the target.

If the crossbow is properly tuned, using a good rest and no wind these arrows are
extremely accurate. Some of these arrows have hundreds of shots on them. I usually
shoot 12 arrows at different target spots before retrieving them.

Wishing you all the best.
Take care.
 

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