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Like the buggy whip manufacturers, there will be less until there is only one. Such times can bring about innovations and actually open the public eye to what value there actually is, in any products on the market. The inflationary trend has gotten to where it is, due to people (top to bottom) willingly over paying for anything and everything. I look forward to the collapse and then to those craftsmen that start building pieces out of their smaller shops, to address the demand.
 

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I've been in the Automation, Controls and Robotics Industry since 1982, designing electrical/electronics circuits, wiring, programming, commissioning, etc.

Sadly, I have watched North American manufacturing jobs leave the country.
First, the large companies (GM, Ford, Chrysler and the like), then their Tier One suppliers.
Of course, this affects the local "Mike's Engineering" and "Joe's Machine Shop" types as they lose contracts to offshore firms.

To my point:
I have gone through a few recent graduates from Masters in Electrical Engineering programs over the past year and do have a hard time finding workers to fill our needs without extensive training.
I am shocked at how much they must be "spoon-fed" almost everything, even things they should have learned in University.
They truly are made from a different mold then graduates even 20 years ago.

We have a weekly "business strategy" meeting where I work.
Yesterday, I found this article (not sure how I stumbled on it) and posted it in our company's Business Strategy chat channel:

More food for thought:
"The fact is: You most likely will need to recruit a set of millennials to replace your key aging baby boomers eventually. Rather than bemoan that fact, the good folks at MiddleMarketGrowth.com (the brilliant article was actually penned by Dan Hawkins, a seasoned business executive and former chief human resources officer and founder of Summit Leadership Partners) provided great advice for how to, instead of fighting this trend, actually position your company to find the best and brightest replacements possible.
Hawkins offers these practical suggestions for business leaders to accomplish this:

  • Assess (or develop) your talent needs and create plans to address future talent gaps. Balance this with the workforce shifts expected over the next five to 10 years.
  • Focus on creating challenging job experiences rather than wasting time on devising elaborate career paths for younger workers—employees no longer place much value on planned, structured development programs.
  • When planning for development, focus on opportunities where an employee can expand his or her skills and interact with senior employees and leaders. Place more value on breadth over depth.
  • Tap into the knowledge base of baby boomers before they retire. Facilitate mentorship between older and younger employees to capture and transfer skills and experience.
  • Create a work environment that allows for individuality, inclusion and flexibility to balance work and life demands.
  • Have succession plans not only for your leadership roles but also for your most critical positions. Identify the jobs that have the greatest impact on your mission or strategy, and look at how and where you can develop or hire talent.
  • Find ways to tie your firm’s purpose, vision and mission to something bigger in society. Corporate and social responsibility initiatives are highly valued by millennials.
  • Finally, ensure that all leaders in your company understand and are accountable for being talent managers—they must feel responsible for the development, exposure and engagement of their people. This is not HR’s job."
Source: Is it time you developed a Baby Boomer replacement plan?

I'm sure it will be brought up by all Dept. heads at this week's meeting.
Truly a sign of the times...
 

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"The fact is: You most likely will need to recruit a set of millennials to replace your key aging baby boomers eventually. Rather than bemoan that fact, the good folks at MiddleMarketGrowth.com (the brilliant article was actually penned by Dan Hawkins, a seasoned business executive and former chief human resources officer and founder of Summit Leadership Partners) provided great advice for how to, instead of fighting this trend, actually position your company to find the best and brightest replacements possible.
Hawkins offers these practical suggestions for business leaders to accomplish this:

  • Assess (or develop) your talent needs and create plans to address future talent gaps. Balance this with the workforce shifts expected over the next five to 10 years.
  • Focus on creating challenging job experiences rather than wasting time on devising elaborate career paths for younger workers—employees no longer place much value on planned, structured development programs.
  • When planning for development, focus on opportunities where an employee can expand his or her skills and interact with senior employees and leaders. Place more value on breadth over depth.
  • Tap into the knowledge base of baby boomers before they retire. Facilitate mentorship between older and younger employees to capture and transfer skills and experience.
  • Create a work environment that allows for individuality, inclusion and flexibility to balance work and life demands.
  • Have succession plans not only for your leadership roles but also for your most critical positions. Identify the jobs that have the greatest impact on your mission or strategy, and look at how and where you can develop or hire talent.
  • Find ways to tie your firm’s purpose, vision and mission to something bigger in society. Corporate and social responsibility initiatives are highly valued by millennials.
  • Finally, ensure that all leaders in your company understand and are accountable for being talent managers—they must feel responsible for the development, exposure and engagement of their people. This is not HR’s job."
Source: Is it time you developed a Baby Boomer replacement plan?
Over the decades I have sat in meetings with this as the topic for discussion. I may have been one of those short sighted and unable to comprehend. It seemed so esoteric and worthy of only those who have time for thought and no time for action. In my years in the workforce I hired several bright, young energetic people to join our company. I had an affinity for those who needed a second chance. I did not hire with wreckless abandon. It was always thoughtful with the position and company in mind. My best people were consistently those who had a mistake or two that put them in the second "tier" of candidates. I only hired one person with a college degree. He was brilliant and moved on to a position worthy of his talent.
I needed people who could learn to write computer code, troubleshoot equipment failures, with great interpersonal and customer skills. I would hire those with the base experience and send them to company training. I or someone with similar experience was a mentor for them while in the field.
I say all that to say this, I think there are several people with logical thought capabilities, math skills, people skills, and work ethic out there. They aren't wrapped up in the package we would hope. Most of my direct reports recognized I gave them a chance at a standard of living that likely would have alluded them. They were very dedicated. When I was asked by corporate about our success, I would just say I have people that go out and make me look good.
 

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Survival of the fittest. We'll see how OEM adapts the best to an ever-changing market place. Time will tell.

The china syndrome is at play more now than ever going back 40 years. It's going to be legit time in months to years to come. 70% of all Pharma is made in China! Making xbows overseas look small but relevant to us and our hunting passions.
 

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My vertical compound bow that I have shot for many years is a older (Alpine archery) bow. One design feature that's kind of different is the riser is made up of several shorter thin plates of machined aluminium that are all tied together using countersink hex bolts and several locating pins. I think it has 6 sections all together. Wooden hand grip.

Gives the bow a very engineered feel. No it's most likely not as stiff as a one piece machined riser but I'm sure at the time the bow was produced it was a lot less expensive to produce than a one piece machined riser. It also gave them a lot of flexibility with the overall dimensional proportions when assembled. Vs being forced to start with a bigger cross section of aluminium to machine a one piece.

Why I mentioned this is. I would much prefer a crossbow with a light weight skeletal aluminium stock that bolted together like the Alpine vertical bow riser than the plastic stocks that are common now. As I feel they make the bows feel like toys.... perhaps I'm just old fashioned.

Even if some of the contact pieces where timber. Like the cheek piece, front hand grip cover for better feel and contrast look.

Would give the crossbow a real classic yet kind of tactical look.
 

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Good! … they abandoned this country overnight, now let them come limping home and pay the price. Let the jobs trickle back. So instead of owning 7 crossbows we now have to buy ONE crossbow? Or me buying a new truck every couple of years I have to hold onto it for 7 years? It ain't gonna cost THAT much more than the $60,000.00 they're getting for a truck made in Mexico to build it here.
This ^ I refuse to feel sorry for corporate greed sending jobs overseas to begin with.
 

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My vertical compound bow that I have shot for many years is a older (Alpine archery) bow. One design feature that's kind of different is the riser is made up of several shorter thin plates of machined aluminium that are all tied together using countersink hex bolts and several locating pins. I think it has 6 sections all together. Wooden hand grip.

Gives the bow a very engineered feel. No it's most likely not as stiff as a one piece machined riser but I'm sure at the time the bow was produced it was a lot less expensive to produce than a one piece machined riser. It also gave them a lot of flexibility with the overall dimensional proportions when assembled. Vs being forced to start with a bigger cross section of aluminium to machine a one piece.

Why I mentioned this is. I would much prefer a crossbow with a light weight skeletal aluminium stock that bolted together like the Alpine vertical bow riser than the plastic stocks that are common now. As I feel they make the bows feel like toys.... perhaps I'm just old fashioned.

Even if some of the contact pieces where timber. Like the cheek piece, front hand grip cover for better feel and contrast look.

Would give the crossbow a real classic yet kind of tactical look.
You ever seen the Gearhead Archery x16?
 

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Much rides on the election here in the US. The tariff could vanish as fast as it came. When that may or may not happen, who knows.
Farm deer,
I am familiar with manufacturing processes and the cost. As an engineer I was involved deeply in the process design and obtaining equipment, supplies, to make automation perform to guide people thru the process of assembly for quality to the customer.
Now that I am retired for 5 years I can reflect on what you are saying and wonder what would it have been like if I continued to work. But I like retirement!!

Good luck!
 

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As an engineer I was involved deeply in the process design and obtaining equipment, supplies, to make automation perform to guide people thru the process of assembly for quality to the customer.
Similar for me, only I am still in it.
The important part here is : ... the process of assembly for quality to the customer ...
The Chinese did/do it dirt cheap, with a huge market of unqualified low-wage labor and very little legal restrictions. That's why those companies moved their production facilities. European one's too.
They gonna pay for that, if they are not already.
 

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Built plastic molds from 73 to 2017, did a video of mold maintenance before a Motorola mold shipped to China back in 2002, with all the rest. I hope they like their choice, it did not make the moldmakers here happy. I have been doing nuisance animal control trapping for my extra money, a lot happier doing that than when I still worked every day, and business is growing. Got my first pension check yesterday from 10 years at Eaton Corp $112, not lucrative to have been in a manufacturing environment for 44 years.
 

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They gonna pay for that, if they are not already.
No question. None of what the Chinese are doing is out of malice. It is survival. But it's only a mater of time where the social and environmental impacts will no longer be suppressed and we will hear about it.
 
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I, like Dyanamo, worked as a control systems engineer for 30 years and our company was automated at a level that would be unbelievable to the average person. This was encouraged by management because we were a key manufacturer in an extremely profitable industry. We also had union labor and management of course had to reduce personnel as union benefits increased.
I hate to say it but this level of automation is prevalent everywhere these days and the implication of this is not all good for the future of our society.
But I firmly believe the most serious problem we have as a country is the fact that our government is simply not structured to be competitive with other governments when it comes to long term planning.
China is cleaning our clock because all we have are politicians who are more worried about getting reelected for the next 2,4 or 6 years than anything else. Many also don't have the experience or education necessary to lead the country. But unfortunately, they are merely reflecting the continued decline of our education system as well as our morals.
Give me a group of highly capable, experienced and ethical folks who aren't affiliated with any political party and represent engineers, scientists, doctors and financial experts. Give them the full freedom to make key decisions for the future of our society and then and only then will we be able to really truly lead the world to a better place
As I've watched what's happened just in the last 4 years, I just shake my head in disbelief and can only conclude: China is winning big time and we are simply clueless. We have indeed lost our way and it's like playing chess with a dude that can't think past 2 moves. Checkmate!!!
 

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I had been SW engineer in a company that made product test equipment for electronics manufacturers, mostly related to the automotive industry. As such, I had the "pleasure" of helping many of our customer companies to move their stuff to China.

The irony is, this has happened before.
The Brits exported their manual labour to their colonies (North America and India), just reaping the final profits for the finished goods for a few decades. The role of contemporary China was then taken by the US and Germany, which started to industrialize at a much faster pace, eventually leaving them behind in the mid 19th century. That shift in economic power played a significant role in the wars that followed afterwards. Which scares me a bit ...
 

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Built plastic molds from 73 to 2017, did a video of mold maintenance before a Motorola mold shipped to China back in 2002, with all the rest. I hope they like their choice, it did not make the moldmakers here happy. I have been doing nuisance animal control trapping for my extra money, a lot happier doing that than when I still worked every day, and business is growing. Got my first pension check yesterday from 10 years at Eaton Corp $112, not lucrative to have been in a manufacturing environment for 44 years.
Yup, many North American companies also ordered molds from China to save $ back then for production use in North America.
They then spent almost as much $$ to repair them.
The quality was really bad at first but China has been able to afford better equipment with the profits they made so quality has risen.
 

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I think the Tesla Shanghai factory experience should be a real wake-up call to us Americans.
Yes, thank God we have the South African Elon Musk but the Chinese not only built that plant in record time, but got it up and running in record time as well. Their auto engineers immediately figured out how to cut out 20% of the cost of the model 3 and then showed Tesla how to make a cheaper and safer battery pack.
Now they are offering a million mile warranty as well as more range. Production quality is higher than in California and production numbers are rising every month.
The Chinese government next offers serious tax advantages for EV customers who travel in their cities to work every day. They also continue to blow us away in educational testing. Everything they do now seems to be directed toward LONG-TERM gains.
They will be installing Molten salt reactors before us, they have considerably more renewable energy than us and the list goes on.
More pertinent to my hobby just to keep busy as a retired person, they are now making these new SLS 3D printers that actually use a 4K LCD screen to cure the resin. This dramatically improves speed with even higher resolution. They are leading us in AI development and rapidly catching up with our military. Space exploration and satellite deployment is also rapidly accelerating not to mention their infrastructure is light years ahead of us. Meanwhile, our roadways and bridges are crumbling apart and we're still guzzling more gas and diesel than anyone else in the world.
Yet, we have millions who are oblivious to it all and just trying to get by from day to day while others can't begin to figure out how to spend all of their money.
Sorry for the rant - I'm done.
 

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I think the Tesla Shanghai factory experience should be a real wake-up call to us Americans.
Yes, thank God we have the South African Elon Musk but the Chinese not only built that plant in record time, but got it up and running in record time as well. Their auto engineers immediately figured out how to cut out 20% of the cost of the model 3 and then showed Tesla how to make a cheaper and safer battery pack.
Now they are offering a million mile warranty as well as more range. Production quality is higher than in California and production numbers are rising every month.
The Chinese government next offers serious tax advantages for EV customers who travel in their cities to work every day. They also continue to blow us away in educational testing. Everything they do now seems to be directed toward LONG-TERM gains.
They will be installing Molten salt reactors before us, they have considerably more renewable energy than us and the list goes on.
More pertinent to my hobby just to keep busy as a retired person, they are now making these new SLS 3D printers that actually use a 4K LCD screen to cure the resin. This dramatically improves speed with even higher resolution. They are leading us in AI development and rapidly catching up with our military. Space exploration and satellite deployment is also rapidly accelerating not to mention their infrastructure is light years ahead of us. Meanwhile, our roadways and bridges are crumbling apart and we're still guzzling more gas and diesel than anyone else in the world.
Yet, we have millions who are oblivious to it all and just trying to get by from day to day while others can't begin to figure out how to spend all of their money.
Sorry for the rant - I'm done.
All of the above is true and we (meaning big North American and European Corporations) handed our technology to China on a silver platter, same as we did with Japan after WW2.
Now Japan's production costs are too high so they are pretty much in the same boat as us.
Thanks very much for looking out for the consumers that made you wealthy, Big Corps...NOT.
But look, Mom, I can buy a 50" TV for $400 CAD.
I really don't know why I get myself worked up like this over something that is out of my hands.
Sure, some will say, "so buy North American".
OK, gladly, show me a North American made TV, for example.
Yes, like BigBird1 said, rant over.
 
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