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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Never seen this before, but this is the first year with a crossbow versus vertical.

29 yard shot, 18 degree angle at a large doe standing broadside.

arrow buried 10” into hard dirt trail
vanes messed up a little but?
“zero blood on arrow” shinny new nock shinny bushing clean arrow and what was left for vanes — No Blood what?
18” zombie killer arrows, 2” Titanium SEVR broadhead, don’t remember what vane.
excellent cut going in but especially coming out wow
arrow speed right at 500 fps
Garmin X1i sight

So my partner shows up at noon to help haul the deer out - perfect chest double lunger and the heart had a long slice in it, as well as when it exited the chest it took out a good size muscle on the opposite front leg it was dead 40 yards from the shot.

He made the comment that looking at the arrow you would say it was a bad shot or a screw up, but the deer got hammered.

How can this be possible to have a clean arrow after such a impact, I dumbfounded

Anyone seen this before, you would almost have to see it for yourself without calling BS

J-Bow
 

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The arrow must have a coating on it like an agent for release from a target. Put some water on it and see it some beads up and some just rolls off. If you go through lungs, unless there is some sort of coating on the arrow tere will be blood, even with a strong wipe on the way out. The fletching usually has some, no matter what.
 

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If it went through an animal it will have some kind of scent to it.
 
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I agree, sad to say the virus killed my sense of smell and taste two years ago

J-Bow
My last harvest was a couple weeks ago and a respectable buck that I shot at 37 yards. I saw the pass through and when I found the arrow, it was clean. No blood on it and nothing to the touch, but it had an odor. No blood for about 30 yards but I did find a trail and did recover him. Have the arrow smell-checked ;)
Head Deer Organism Wood Natural material
 

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My brother once sprayed his arrows with silicone spray while target shooting to make them easier to pull from the target and then forgot to wipe them clean after. He shot a nice buck the next day and his arrow was clean as could be except for dirt on it sticking in the ground. We would have thought it was a clean miss except for a very good blood trail.
 

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I doubt that the speed had a lot to do with it. I double lunged a 9 point at 30 yards at 430 fps and my arrow was covered with blood when I found it and the arrow passed through the deer, side swiped a small tree cutting a gouge in the tree and I found it about 15 yards away from the tree it hit.
 

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Scorpyd Orion Ravin R9
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I have heard that fat can clean the arrow pretty well?? I almost never even find my arrows because I am on the ground, and the shots are often parallel to the ground. I have seen some pretty clean arrows however on videos, with just the faintest gloss of blood on the fletchings.
 

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I have heard that fat can clean the arrow pretty well?? I almost never even find my arrows because I am on the ground, and the shots are often parallel to the ground. I have seen some pretty clean arrows however on videos, with just the faintest gloss of blood on the fletchings.
Just my thought here:
In regards to fat, when an arrow first enters a deer's body, if there is a layer of fat,
this would grease or oil coat an arrow so very little to nothing would stick.

Wishing you all the best.
Take care.
 

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Excalibur Vortex 330, Centerpoint Sniper 370, Centerpoint Patriot 425
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More times than not there isnt all that much blood on my carbon arrows. That's the biggest part I miss about not using aluminum arrows. There's a couple pics of a shot deer that didnt leave hardly ANYTHING on the arrow or the ground. It ran about 125-150 yards.

Jaw Scar Fawn Snout Human leg


Neck Jaw Eyelash Bird Whiskers
 

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Just my thought here:
In regards to fat, when an arrow first enters a deer's body, if there is a layer of fat,
this would grease or oil coat an arrow so very little to nothing would stick.

Wishing you all the best.
Take care.
This is just plain nonsense. Blood adheres to fat very well on deer bodies. Every hunter who's ever removed a hide from deer has seen it. Virtually every deer those of use in cold country shoot after October is fully encased in fat, maybe no a lot, but fat nonetheless. There is fat to which blood does not stick well at all in a deer though. The abdominal fat found inside of the deer is actually an organ, the Omentum. Oddly, the omentun is quite sticky and adheres to abdominal wounds. It stick not only to punctures in intestines and other organs, but also very well to holes to the outside world. It is the main reason why many abdominal wounds produce poor to non-existent blood trails.
 

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This is just plain nonsense. Blood adheres to fat very well on deer bodies. Every hunter who's ever removed a hide from deer has seen it. Virtually every deer those of use in cold country shoot after October is fully encased in fat, maybe no a lot, but fat nonetheless. There is fat to which blood does not stick well at all in a deer though. The abdominal fat found inside of the deer is actually an organ, the Omentum. Oddly, the omentun is quite sticky and adheres to abdominal wounds. It stick not only to punctures in intestines and other organs, but also very well to holes to the outside world. It is the main reason why many abdominal wounds produce poor to non-existent blood trails.
I submitted that as a suggestion.
In regards to what you mention hunters have found, yes, but there is a big difference skinning or cutting
an animal open as to the speed and arrow goes through it.

Here is a simple example: suppose one is sharpening a pencil and the knife slips and nicks ones finger.
Unless that knife is held on the wound, there will be no blood on the knife. It takes a second or mili second
for the blood to surface.

In your response, you never mentioned why there may be no blood on some of these arrows that people
have shot and harvested deer with.

Wishing you all the best.
Take care.
 

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"The arrow must have a coating on it like an agent for release from a target. Put some water on it and see it some beads up and some just rolls off. If you go through lungs, unless there is some sort of coating on the arrow tere will be blood, even with a strong wipe on the way out. The fletching usually has some, no matter what. "

I don't know what you'd call the above which I posted early in the thread if not an explanation of why there might be no blood on the arrow.

Secondly, you are mistaking the response of poorly perfused tissue like the thicker skin on finger which often are calloused enough to slice off an eighth inch without blooding at all.

Lastly, putting an arrow through the lung(s) of a deer irrespective of the speed will result in blood on the arrow because there is something like 100 mm of mercury worth of blood pressure on that tissue which is very thin and very friable. That pressure means that the arrow is literally passing through blood, not dry tissue like skin.

I have used hydrophobic coatings on arrows as a release agent to make removal from targets. Those coatings can and do prevent wetting to themselves and thus to the arrow since the coating bonds very well to the arrow if the arrow is properly cleaned before hand

If the nonsense your are claiming were true, then there would be noticeable degrees of blood coating on the arrows like blood on the arrow starting some distance back from the head. In reality, deer shot with arrows normally produce an arrow coated from the tip of the broadhead to the nock. In the case of flatnocks which I use exclusively, the nock is normally coated with blood on the very back flat face of the nock, even into the mold release indent in the back of Lumenoks. The lipids in the blood reduce surface tension
 

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I have seen this happen a couple times myself recently. The first time I pulled the arrow out of the dirt and showed it to my buddy when he came over to my stand after the hunt and he said I had a clean miss. I said well that's weird then, because the deer is laying dead right over there (I had seen it crash) :ROFLMAO:

Both times were from fast, 400fps or higher, crossbows. Dozens of shots prior to that with crossbows closer to 300-330fps and I had never seen it. So my assumption has been that speed does play a role in it. Just my observations.
 
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I have seen this happen a couple times myself recently. The first time I pulled the arrow out of the dirt and showed it to my buddy when he came over to my stand after the hunt and he said I had a clean miss. I said well that's weird then, because the deer is laying dead right over there (I had seen it crash) :ROFLMAO:

Both times were from fast, 400fps or higher, crossbows. Dozens of shots prior to that with crossbows closer to 300-330fps and I had never seen it. So my assumption has been that speed does play a role in it. Just my observations.
the last deer I shot didn’t show any signs of blood on the arrow. I’m guessing it shoots in the high 320s. excal 335.
high entrance with a low exit that never bleed except threw the nose and mouth. Just like you said, complete pass through and stuck in the dirt. I knew I made a good shot but it sure didn’t show on the arrow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
"The arrow must have a coating on it like an agent for release from a target. Put some water on it and see it some beads up and some just rolls off. If you go through lungs, unless there is some sort of coating on the arrow tere will be blood, even with a strong wipe on the way out. The fletching usually has some, no matter what. "

I don't know what you'd call the above which I posted early in the thread if not an explanation of why there might be no blood on the arrow.

Secondly, you are mistaking the response of poorly perfused tissue like the thicker skin on finger which often are calloused enough to slice off an eighth inch without blooding at all.

Lastly, putting an arrow through the lung(s) of a deer irrespective of the speed will result in blood on the arrow because there is something like 100 mm of mercury worth of blood pressure on that tissue which is very thin and very friable. That pressure means that the arrow is literally passing through blood, not dry tissue like skin.

I have used hydrophobic coatings on arrows as a release agent to make removal from targets. Those coatings can and do prevent wetting to themselves and thus to the arrow since the coating bonds very well to the arrow if the arrow is properly cleaned before hand

If the nonsense your are claiming were true, then there would be noticeable degrees of blood coating on the arrows like blood on the arrow starting some distance back from the head. In reality, deer shot with arrows normally produce an arrow coated from the tip of the broadhead to the nock. In the case of flatnocks which I use exclusively, the nock is normally coated with blood on the very back flat face of the nock, even into the mold release indent in the back of Lumenoks. The lipids in the blood reduce surface tension
No there is no coating or target release agents on arrow. also the nonsense that was stated is true at my age I don’t have time to play make believe.

J-Bow
 
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