Crossbow Nation banner
41 - 56 of 56 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
636 Posts
From Bowhunting Safari Consultants:

Desert Sheep Mexico $28,000
Alaska Moose $22,500
Woodland Caribou Newfoundland $13,000
Elk British Columbia $28,500
Audad and Deer Combo Texas (4 days) $12,500

Anyone that claims African Safaris are too expensive are seriously mistaken.
I hunted woodland caribou years ago for $2500 lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,759 Posts
Discussion Starter · #42 ·
I hunted woodland caribou years ago for $2500 lol
I believe it. When I Mosse hunted in Newfoundland, the Guide told me Woodland Caribou were so plentiful, they would stand on travel routes and look over hundreds of them in a day until an animal they wanted to harvest came by.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 0002s

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,304 Posts
I have a bucket list of hunts, but Africa isn't on it, and neither are those places listed at the start of the thread.
When I was younger, I had a bucket list too. As time went by and hunts got more expensive my bucket has dwindled down to a coffee cup. I'm tired of driving anyway.....
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
14,038 Posts
Maybe it's me ... but I get almost as much of a thrill making a shot on a squirrel as a deer as a hog. I'm not a trophy hunter so I have no desire for a male lion head on my wall. Or to whack some big bear to say I could. Over populated bears or rogue bear, no problem though. I love the comradery of "deer camp" or of a team when away on a project. I enjoy the newness of a different place so I can see a lot of what a safari brings to the table. Hasn't been worth 45k to me though ...lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
The only difference is the bigger hunting area. And South Africa has been managing the areas with fences. But some of the areas are so big you will drive for miles without seeing the border fence. And If you know anything about the game animals that live on the African continent, you will know that most except a few like the African Elephant have smaller home ranges. That means even if you put them on a piece of land the size of America the home range remains small and if you hunt that animal he will not run from one border of the USA to the next to evade you. He will only run to the border of his territory and back evading you. I've heard a lot of people saying they don't hunt high fences in SA because it's too easy. Well come over and see for yourself if it's easy. The animal's senses remain the same. And you will have a tuff time hunting a Kudu or any of the other game animals even on a piece of land that's 2400 acres in size.

JH HUNTER
One can’t understand other types hunting, customs, terrane, methods and so on until they have hunted there and experience it.

I find northern and north east US hunters are the hardest to explain this to as they’ve never hunted any place other than their local state public land. In some instances they don’t know that some states or countries don’t have public land. There is sometimes a belief that hunting for the price of gas, food and beer is more noble and or harder than doing exactly the same thing but paying the land owner, guide and a trophy fee.

Until I started hunting in different places for different game did I understand that location’s hunting methods are what they are because that’s what the game requires to get it into range. It’s not that they are making it easier.

FWIW, start walking in a direction. You’ll always run into a border.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,759 Posts
Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Maybe it's me ... but I get almost as much of a thrill making a shot on a squirrel as a deer as a hog. I'm not a trophy hunter so I have no desire for a male lion head on my wall. Or to whack some big bear to say I could. Over populated bears or rogue bear, no problem though. I love the comradery of "deer camp" or of a team when away on a project. I enjoy the newness of a different place so I can see a lot of what a safari brings to the table. Hasn't been worth 45k to me though ...lol
I was on two Safaris. First was a rifle hunt, the second was crossbow. Was a "whole" experience, not just about slaying trophy animals. It is like a vacation/hunt hybrid. I was absolutely amazed at the tracking skills of the natives. It's beyond belief. Better than a dog's sense of smell because they use prints/tracks as well as blood. I also like hunting in a different environment. I hunted deer in several States, and I always felt like I was home as all the terrain/woods/farms looked the same. I hunted Newfoundland, Canada and while it was beautiful, the environment could be harsh and animal sightings could be scarce. On Safari, you also get to meet people from all over the world although most of the hunters are from the U.S.
I was raised a "meat" hunter. We never missed an opportunity to fill the freezer in order to bag a trophy. I am still a "meat" hunter. I never hold out for a trophy deer in my home area. When I came home from Safari last September, I went hunting a few days later. It was early season and only antlerless deer were legal. I harvested a Doe that evening, and it was just as exciting as harvesting any other animal.
Again, I look at a Safari as a mind-expanding experience, not just to collect trophies.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
2,332 Posts
The only difference is the bigger hunting area. And South Africa has been managing the areas with fences. But some of the areas are so big you will drive for miles without seeing the border fence. And If you know anything about the game animals that live on the African continent, you will know that most except a few like the African Elephant have smaller home ranges. That means even if you put them on a piece of land the size of America the home range remains small and if you hunt that animal he will not run from one border of the USA to the next to evade you. He will only run to the border of his territory and back evading you. I've heard a lot of people saying they don't hunt high fences in SA because it's too easy. Well come over and see for yourself if it's easy. The animal's senses remain the same. And you will have a tuff time hunting a Kudu or any of the other game animals even on a piece of land that's 2400 acres in size. By the way, it's only when things go wrong, and you make a bad shot and need to follow up on a wounded animal that you would have wished for a smaller hunting area. I've had to follow many wounded game, and at the beginning of this year spend 5 days on a wounded Waterbucks tracks and never caught up to it. The hunting area was 5000 acres. The Waterbuck was found dead 600yards from where it was shot at. It just evaded us in its own territory for 5 days. By the way, Waterbuck bulls have home ranges that are about 350 acres. And we are not even talking about the dangers of hunting in Africa or South Africa. You can bump one of the big 5 or an angry Hippo and so on while you hunt. Then some of you who followed me here when I first joined will recall there was a time that I wassent active on CB nation. That's because I almost gave up hunting for good. My first wife was killed by a Giraffe cow that was trying to protect her young calve. My wife was walking the dogs and the dogs saw the mother Giraffe and started to bark at her. The cow kicked at one of the dogs and as my wife was trying to pick the dog up she got kicked on her back. The kick broke her neck and burst her lungs. She died instantly. So it's not only the dangerous game that can kill you. This is Africa boet.

JH HUNTER
So sorry to hear about your wife. But I guess you sort of made my point. I doubt seriously in Africa with no fences someone would be able to just walk up to a giraffe with a dog close enough to be kicked. Here are just a couple of pictures I took with my phone from about 20 yards. I could have easily shot them with my bow, just couldn't afford to shoot them. Btw, it's nice to be able to hunt inside a fence where you know there are no lions etc going to come hunting you.
Plant Vertebrate Grass Fawn Horn
Vertebrate Working animal Plant Elephant Elephants and Mammoths
Natural environment Working animal Organism Grass Terrestrial animal
;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,812 Posts
One can’t understand other types hunting, customs, terrane, methods and so on until they have hunted there and experience it.

I find northern and north east US hunters are the hardest to explain this to as they’ve never hunted any place other than their local state public land. In some instances they don’t know that some states or countries don’t have public land. There is sometimes a belief that hunting for the price of gas, food and beer is more noble and or harder than doing exactly the same thing but paying the land owner, guide and a trophy fee.

Until I started hunting in different places for different game did I understand that location’s hunting methods are what they are because that’s what the game requires to get it into range. It’s not that they are making it easier.

FWIW, start walking in a direction. You’ll always run into a border.
Tell that to the illegals flooding into our country on what used to be our southern border.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
1,325 Posts
So sorry to hear about your wife. But I guess you sort of made my point. I doubt seriously in Africa with no fences someone would be able to just walk up to a giraffe with a dog close enough to be kicked. Here are just a couple of pictures I took with my phone from about 20 yards. I could have easily shot them with my bow, just couldn't afford to shoot them. Btw, it's nice to be able to hunt inside a fence where you know there are no lions etc going to come hunting you. View attachment 229785 View attachment 229786 View attachment 229788 ;)
I'm heading to one of my favorite hunting spots in 2 weeks to end our season hopefully in a good way. look at the photo. one of the boundary fences can be seen on the left side, now if you follow that fence up until the outcrop far in the distance you will come to the other end. The little mountain outcrop in the distance. And no I don't get your point! the Giraffes were at that place at that time. No fence put them there. You can say she was at the wrong place at the wrong time. Get out of your car or blind you were in and hunt the animals you posted photos of on foot. Whole different game. What is your point exactly? You think in Africa Giraffes are not going to protect their young. There was not a fence in 4 miles from where that happened. Do you think she walked up to them? She was taking a walk and walked into them without seeing them. She knew the bush and would not walk close to them with the dogs. Use something else to make your point you were not there and don't know the full story. And like previously stated not only lions that will kill you in Africa. On this same property, I was almost Leopard bait. I was waiting for the vehicle to pick me up and take me back to camp, it was already dusk and getting dark fast. Only a sixth sense saved me. But that's a story for another day.


JH HUNTER
 

·
Member
Joined
·
1,325 Posts
So sorry to hear about your wife. But I guess you sort of made my point. I doubt seriously in Africa with no fences someone would be able to just walk up to a giraffe with a dog close enough to be kicked. Here are just a couple of pictures I took with my phone from about 20 yards. I could have easily shot them with my bow, just couldn't afford to shoot them. Btw, it's nice to be able to hunt inside a fence where you know there are no lions etc going to come hunting you. View attachment 229785 View attachment 229786 View attachment 229788 ;)
Maybe look into changing the photo names to South Africa. It still says, Africa.

JH HUNTER
 

·
Member
Joined
·
1,325 Posts
I will make this my last post on the subject. The beauty of hunting in South Africa is that you can have a hunt as hard as you need or want it to be. You can hunt bow blinds, treestands, or a bigger area on foot. You can hunt with a bow in hand, or rifle or whatever you fancy. You can hunt an area with none of the big 5 or some of it, or all of the big 5 on it. You can even hunt the hunting blocks bordering the Kruger National Park where there is no fence between Kruger and the hunting areas. You know real grumpy old buffalo bulls that are being harassed daily by lions. Just call me or send me a mail and I will gladly hook you up with one of the outfitters in that area. One is a good school friend of mine. look up his Instagram or website if you want. AH Van Heerden (@this_is_africa_safaris) • Instagram photos and videos South Africa is truly the hunter's paradise. And we need overseas hunters because hunting is truly the only way to conserve the biodiversity, habitat, and game animals of Africa.

JH HUNTER
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,938 Posts
He’s talking to me. Jim invited me to hunt with him the coming season. (y) :D
You lucky dog, LOL. Well, look at this way, if you don't see any deer, you will have a chance to shoot every bow known to man at Jim's!!!

Sounds like a fun trip, not that I'm jealous or anything......
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,896 Posts
You lucky dog, LOL. Well, look at this way, if you don't see any deer, you will have a chance to shoot every bow known to man at Jim's!!!

Sounds like a fun trip, not that I'm jealous or anything......
The way I am selling off bows there may not be many left for him to shoot by the time he gets here!!

Don't be jealous...come on up, I've got a stand to sit your butt in...just a very long car ride away! 😂
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,896 Posts
The only difference is the bigger hunting area. And South Africa has been managing the areas with fences. But some of the areas are so big you will drive for miles without seeing the border fence. And If you know anything about the game animals that live on the African continent, you will know that most except a few like the African Elephant have smaller home ranges. That means even if you put them on a piece of land the size of America the home range remains small and if you hunt that animal he will not run from one border of the USA to the next to evade you. He will only run to the border of his territory and back evading you. I've heard a lot of people saying they don't hunt high fences in SA because it's too easy. Well come over and see for yourself if it's easy. The animal's senses remain the same. And you will have a tuff time hunting a Kudu or any of the other game animals even on a piece of land that's 2400 acres in size. By the way, it's only when things go wrong, and you make a bad shot and need to follow up on a wounded animal that you would have wished for a smaller hunting area. I've had to follow many wounded game, and at the beginning of this year spend 5 days on a wounded Waterbucks tracks and never caught up to it. The hunting area was 5000 acres. The Waterbuck was found dead 600yards from where it was shot at. It just evaded us in its own territory for 5 days. By the way, Waterbuck bulls have home ranges that are about 350 acres. And we are not even talking about the dangers of hunting in Africa or South Africa. You can bump one of the big 5 or an angry Hippo and so on while you hunt. Then some of you who followed me here when I first joined will recall there was a time that I wassent active on CB nation. That's because I almost gave up hunting for good. My first wife was killed by a Giraffe cow that was trying to protect her young calve. My wife was walking the dogs and the dogs saw the mother Giraffe and started to bark at her. The cow kicked at one of the dogs and as my wife was trying to pick the dog up she got kicked on her back. The kick broke her neck and burst her lungs. She died instantly. So it's not only the dangerous game that can kill you. This is Africa boet.

JH HUNTER
Very sorry for your tragic lose JH. 😔
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,938 Posts
The way I am selling off bows there may not be many left for him to shoot by the time he gets here!!

Don't be jealous...come on up, I've got a stand to sit your butt in...just a very long car ride away! 😂
So, it's BYOB? " Bring your own bow"..........
 
41 - 56 of 56 Posts
Top