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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This will work for the R10. Should be easy to do on the ground or with it sitting on a Fieldpod Max in a blind, or unloading in ladder stand. If seating it in a ladder stand in the dark I might need to wear a headlight or hold a flashlight in my mouth.

I've only turkey hunted on the ground with the R10 so far, we'll see how it goes.

Danny Miller bolt loader - YouTube
 
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Seems ... to me the only real danger is from getting cutup by the stiff vanes if the bow fired. Wouldn't a decent pair of gloves pretty much accomplish the same thing without all the falderal associated with using a piers?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Seems ... to me the only real danger is from getting cutup by the stiff vanes if the bow fired. Wouldn't a decent pair of gloves pretty much accomplish the same thing without all the falderal associated with using a piers?
Probably - but I’m using the Aerorest on the front end there isn’t a lot of room to manipulate the shaft onto the ceramic balls.

With the factory rest I would think thick leather gloves would work just fine.
 
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More stuff to carry with you, pull out of your pocket, make noise, then put away. If you hold the bolt in the right spot you won't get hit by a string.
 

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Here's what bothers me about the bolt loader. You think you'll be able to hold onto it if loading an arrow and the latches decide to let go? That bolt loader can end up doing damage itself. There has to be a better solution out there. Just my opinion on it.
 

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Here's what bothers me about the bolt loader. You think you'll be able to hold onto it if loading an arrow and the latches decide to let go? That bolt loader can end up doing damage itself. There has to be a better solution out there. Just my opinion on it.
There's ... a few issues for "me" using that tool.
#1. Carrying it, getting it out of pocket or backpack, crossbow in my lap, 35' up in a tree, deer all around, retrieving an arrow and grabbing it with the pliers. Lotta, lotta stuff going on there. Crank that you have to use TWICE to cock your Ravin in one pocket, pliers in another? It turns into a tool-a-thon just to get a second shot away...lol I'd need a third or 4th hand to keep everything from falling out of the tree.:oops:😂
#2. With no rail to guide your arrow, getting the arrow through the front picatinny anchor bridge, then up into the trigger box tunnel is enough of a hunt & peck operation even with direct control of the arrow with your fingers. Put a tool between me and the arrow and I'd lose both control and feel. In the semi-dark? Under pressure?
#3. On my R29X, snapping the nock onto the string takes a surprising amount of force; probably 20x that of a Firenock being seated. How's the tool deal with that under field conditions? Cracked arrow if you slip with it?
#4. How about arrows with slickum on them for easy pulling from targets?

Looks like a great tool, great idea for the right guy and the right conditions. Not bad for one shot hunters either. I wear Mechanix gloves every time I hunt, fall, winter and spring. Probably good enough to prevent getting cut to the bone by a plastic vane during an accidental discharge. Likely sting like the devil though...lol:cry:

Good thing about this thread is it's motivated me to put on gloves every time I shoot, even sighting in. I have to admit, getting an arrow loaded into my Ravin felt decidedly risky.
 
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I have had 3 strings on my R20 and they were all hard to snap on when new but after 20 or 30 or so shots they all snap on fairly easy. I can load using 2 fingers now but when new had to grab the arrow and push it hard to get it to snap on. I now use the tool from BB1 and it really helps to break in a new string serving.
 

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I like to keep it simple when it comes to loading an arrow. It's something that needs to be done very precise and I want to feel as much as I can to make sure it's loaded perfectly. I need to feel the snap as the nock seats onto the string. Then I'm confident. The thought of the latches letting loose at the exact moment I'm seating the arrow.......well......... it's just a thought... the more one dwells on the chances of improbability the more life becomes a state of paranoid delusions which will prevent any type of progress or just the plain thrill of it all....... I know it's important to keep safety first but I'm not an extremist and this is my opinion..... have fun, you only live once.....
 

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There's ... a few issues for "me" using that tool.
#1. Carrying it, getting it out of pocket or backpack, crossbow in my lap, 35' up in a tree, deer all around, retrieving an arrow and grabbing it with the pliers. Lotta, lotta stuff going on there. Crank that you have to use TWICE to cock your Ravin in one pocket, pliers in another? It turns into a tool-a-thon just to get a second shot away...lol I'd need a third or 4th hand to keep everything from falling out of the tree.:oops:😂
#2. With no rail to guide your arrow, getting the arrow through the front picatinny anchor bridge, then up into the trigger box tunnel is enough of a hunt & peck operation even with direct control of the arrow with your fingers. Put a tool between me and the arrow and I'd lose both control and feel. In the semi-dark? Under pressure?
#3. On my R29X, snapping the nock onto the string takes a surprising amount of force; probably 20x that of a Firenock being seated. How's the tool deal with that under field conditions? Cracked arrow if you slip with it?
#4. How about arrows with slickum on them for easy pulling from targets?

Looks like a great tool, great idea for the right guy and the right conditions. Not bad for one shot hunters either. I wear Mechanix gloves every time I hunt, fall, winter and spring. Probably good enough to prevent getting cut to the bone by a plastic vane during an accidental discharge. Likely sting like the devil though...lol:cry:

Good thing about this thread is it's motivated me to put on gloves every time I shoot, even sighting in. I have to admit, getting an arrow loaded into my Ravin felt decidedly risky.
You think loading one feels risky try pulling one from the string when loaded. LOL.

Im with you on all the above. Less crap to deal with the better.

I like my Ravins with no doubt but they sure aren't designed for pest control. LOL
 

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I like to keep it simple when it comes to loading an arrow. It's something that needs to be done very precise and I want to feel as much as I can to make sure it's loaded perfectly. I need to feel the snap as the nock seats onto the string. Then I'm confident. The thought of the latches letting loose at the exact moment I'm seating the arrow.......well......... it's just a thought... the more one dwells on the chances of improbability the more life becomes a state of paranoid delusions which will prevent any type of progress or just the plain thrill of it all....... I know it's important to keep safety first but I'm not an extremist and this is my opinion..... have fun, you only live once.....
202370
 
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