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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I wanted to revisit this crossbow accessory to share it's price point value for crossbow users. Also, I realize this is not for everyone, maybe the few but wanted to share my position and experience.

Why? I had to purchase something to replace my 4x32 illuminated scope for western hunts in Colorado. I qualify to use a crossbow due to my physical joint condition and the only options are sights or red dot sights. So that became my default on my new then Barnett Raptor Pro STR earlier this year. I never used the OEM scope as a result.



Red dot sights (typically) are non magnified but battery operated devices that display a red or green dot in the view window. Some sights can display both. So basically no magnification looking through a window to view your target. I selected TruGlo Crossbow sight because it displayed three dots. FYI: Red is the only color option.

Default settings:
The dots come fixed at 20, 35 and 50 yards. It can be re-sighted to different shooting ranges which I did. More on that later.

Accuracy:
TruGlo works similar to powered based crossbow scopes. You have dials to adjust for windage and elevation. To dial in accuracy for off ranged distances between 20, 35 and 50 yards you will have to spend time to record elevation adjustments between the red dots. At least that's what I did.

Re-sighting to different yardages:

For me I did re-sight my tri-dots for my western hunt for spot and stalking Antelope and Mule deer in open prairie ranges. This type of hunt requires longer range shooting. You are lucky to get within 40-80 yards so I re-sighted the dots to 35, 50 and 70 yards. After spending some time on the range zeroing my first dot to 35 yards to match my FPS Crossbow using 452 grain arrow/field tips I determined there was about 4" elevation difference between the dots. So if I was shooting at 40 yards I would raise my first dot (35 yards) 4"-5" above my POI target. Some may not like guesstimated shooting approach but it worked very well for me. This played out consistently throughout all the red dots. I got very accurate results out to eighty yards. Note: The dots progressively get smaller the further out you shoot. I found this to be very beneficial. My re-sighted bottom dot at 70 yards was almost the size of a pin dot but that really allow me to be dial in my accuracy at 70 yards. Groupings were within two inches. One other note: I noticed. that if I had to shoot from 20 yards I just aimed 4" below the aim point to hit the POI bullseye.

Reliability:

My TruGlo held true to it's yardages if not shot over extended period of time. Western hunt Note: When going from 600' elevation to 4,000' elevation I did not have to adjust my elevation. That surprised me. No adjustment was needed. Now I can't tell you why nor do I care to. I looked at it as, "It works". Score!

Cons:
1.
There are negatives because you have to spend time dialing in the yardages for three dots. Write them down and then memorize.
2. Low light condition the sight will not bring in as much light vs a magnified scope. So shooting further out can become more challenging in low light but it's doable.

Pros:
1.
If your eyesight is degrading red dots can be a value add vs blurry scope numbers. Since I have put my speed scope back on my crossbow I have to use my glasses to see scope reticle numbers. That is a major pain to me. So much so after this hunting season I'm going back to my red dot sight.
2. TruGlo weighs noticeably less weight adds value when walking longer distances. Walking and crawling 3 plus miles a day, trust me 1 lb makes a difference to my aging legs/knees.
3. It's easier for me to sight in my focal point quickly vs a powered scope when putting the butt stock to cheek. Maybe that's just me but I see a difference.
4. Cost: You can find this sight for as low as $45 on Amazon.
5. Accuracy is there. I have sub 3" at 70 yards. That's good enough for me.

IMG_2601.jpeg


Conclusion:
There are many great scope options out there but not all people are the same. If you want something simple, lightweight that's accurate and doesn't require glasses for many this is a very affordable sight that works for hunters. To be clear this scope is legit and don't be confused by it's sub $50 price tag.

 

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Great recommendation. Being a Shotgun Slug Shooter, I am aware that scopes have to hold up to hard recoiling guns but I never considered a crossbow to have issues with recoil. Just about any scope should hold up.
 

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I wanted to revisit this crossbow accessory to share it's price point value for crossbow users. Also, I realize this is not for everyone, maybe the few but wanted to share my position and experience.

Why? I had to purchase something to replace my 4x32 illuminated scope for western hunts in Colorado. I qualify to use a crossbow due to my physical joint condition and the only options are sights or red dot sights. So that became my default on my new then Barnett Raptor Pro STR earlier this year. I never used the OEM scope as a result.



Red dot sights (typically) are non magnified but battery operated devices that display a red or green dot in the view window. Some sights can display both. So basically no magnification looking through a window to view your target. I selected TruGlo Crossbow sight because it displayed three dots. FYI: Red is the only color option.

Default settings:
The dots come fixed at 20, 35 and 50 yards. It can be re-sighted to different shooting ranges which I did. More on that later.

Accuracy:
TruGlo works similar to powered based crossbow scopes. You have dials to adjust for windage and elevation. To dial in accuracy for off ranged distances between 20, 35 and 50 yards you will have to spend time to record elevation adjustments between the red dots. At least that's what I did.

Re-sighting to different yardages:

For me I did re-sight my tri-dots for my western hunt for spot and stalking Antelope and Mule deer in open prairie ranges. This type of hunt requires longer range shooting. You are lucky to get within 40-80 yards so I re-sighted the dots to 35, 50 and 70 yards. After spending some time on the range zeroing my first dot to 35 yards to match my FPS Crossbow using 452 grain arrow/field tips I determined there was about 4" elevation difference between the dots. So if I was shooting at 40 yards I would raise my first dot (35 yards) 4"-5" above my POI target. Some may not like guesstimated shooting approach but it worked very well for me. This played out consistently throughout all the red dots. I got very accurate results out to eighty yards. Note: The dots progressively get smaller the further out you shoot. I found this to be very beneficial. My re-sighted bottom dot at 70 yards was almost the size of a pin dot but that really allow me to be dial in my accuracy at 70 yards. Groupings were within two inches. One other note: I noticed. that if I had to shoot from 20 yards I just aimed 4" below the aim point to hit the POI bullseye.

Reliability:

My TruGlo held true to it's yardages if not shot over extended period of time. Western hunt Note: When going from 600' elevation to 4,000' elevation I did not have to adjust my elevation. That surprised me. No adjustment was needed. Now I can't tell you why nor do I care to. I looked at it as, "It works". Score!

Cons:
1.
There are negatives because you have to spend time dialing in the yardages for three dots. Write them down and then memorize.
2. Low light condition the sight will not bring in as much light vs a magnified scope. So shooting further out can become more challenging in low light but it's doable.

Pros:
1.
If your eyesight is degrading red dots can be a value add vs blurry scope numbers. Since I have put my speed scope back on my crossbow I have to use my glasses to see scope reticle numbers. That is a major pain to me. So much so after this hunting season I'm going back to my red dot sight.
2. TruGlo weighs noticeably less weight adds value when walking longer distances. Walking and crawling 3 plus miles a day, trust me 1 lb makes a difference to my aging legs/knees.
3. It's easier for me to sight in my focal point quickly vs a powered scope when putting the butt stock to cheek. Maybe that's just me but I see a difference.
4. Cost: You can find this sight for as low as $45 on Amazon.
5. Accuracy is there. I have sub 3" at 70 yards. That's good enough for me.

View attachment 137340

Conclusion:
There are many great scope options out there but not all people are the same. If you want something simple, lightweight that's accurate and doesn't require glasses for many this is a very affordable sight that works for hunters. To be clear this scope is legit and don't be confused by it's sub $50 price tag.

Nice work, this is the scope I have decided on.
I am new to Crossbows and this is good info. I live in CO and I am aware of the scope requirements; am in the middle of my Accommodation Permit as of this writing.
Where were you hunting? I live in Montrose, on the Western Slope. Primarily hunt elk. Jerry made up some Tapps for me and they came in at 418 gr with 150 gr broad heads.
Ever need any info on elk or muleys or bears drop me a PM.
Pete
 

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My g/f uses a single dot truglo on hers S.A. Sports "Fever" for up to 25 yard shots.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Nice work, this is the scope I have decided on.
I am new to Crossbows and this is good info. I live in CO and I am aware of the scope requirements; am in the middle of my Accommodation Permit as of this writing.
Where were you hunting? I live in Montrose, on the Western Slope. Primarily hunt elk. Jerry made up some Tapps for me and they came in at 418 gr with 150 gr broad heads.
Ever need any info on elk or muleys or bears drop me a PM.
Pete
We hunt eastern side, Comanche Grasslands. Mule deer and pronghorn. Hunting elk is on my bucket list.

All the best.
 

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We hunt eastern side, Comanche Grasslands. Mule deer and pronghorn. Hunting elk is on my bucket list.

All the best.
I know that country well. Well known for big cougars too.
There are a lot of elk out there as well. Concentrate on Kim.
But you'll have more fun in the mountains bugling and stalking. You can still crawl if you want to but it isn't necessary.
If you want to come to the mountains, give me a shout. I'll point you in the right directions.
PR
 

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I know that country well. Well known for big cougars too.
There are a lot of elk out there as well. Concentrate on Kim.
But you'll have more fun in the mountains bugling and stalking. You can still crawl if you want to but it isn't necessary.
If you want to come to the mountains, give me a shout. I'll point you in the right directions.
PR
Tom, looks like you made a good contact here in oldsrtfx.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yep, PM's have been exchanged!

This guy is expanding his options.;)
 

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I know that country well. Well known for big cougars too.
There are a lot of elk out there as well. Concentrate on Kim.
But you'll have more fun in the mountains bugling and stalking. You can still crawl if you want to but it isn't necessary.
If you want to come to the mountains, give me a shout. I'll point you in the right directions.
PR
I went twice to Colorado to hunt elk. We hunted around Steam Boat Springs not too far from the park. We saw a ton of elk but in the two years I went wasn’t able to connect but we were in to them every day and at night , chasing them right up to the black timber...in the aspen meadow where we camped they would serenade us all night long.. Would love to go one more time before I die. My friend out there passed away at the age of 42 from leukaemia......
Miss him everyday.....
 

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I was pretty sure when I was asking you about red dots you shot a Sig Romeo, then I noticed how old this thread is
 
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