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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have a new WR INVADER 400. Dead on with fild tips. Rage hypos and nap kill zone hit the same spot just 6or 7 inches left what do I do?

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So I have a new WR INVADER 400. Dead on with fild tips. Rage hypos and nap kill zone hit the same spot just 6or 7 inches left what do I do?
I sight all of my bows in with broadheads when hunting season is here and it stays that way until hunting season is over.
Like BigBowMan said.
Hard to get Field and Broadhead tips to it dead nuts same hole.
Doesn't matter the xbow or arrows.
Set your scope with broadheads when ready to hunt and leave it.
Reset it for Field Points.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have never had issues with rage or kill zones. Is this a cross bow thing? My much slower bow shoots them the same.

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I never had any trouble with the rage heads shooting that far off from field points. Are you pulling the field points and screwing on a broad head or shooting different arrows than the ones with the field points on? I'm thinking you have more than one problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I grabbed multiple arrows and made multiple shots. At first I thought the blades where opening but the consistency was good. So I taped the blades shut on a rage and it hit left like every other head. With my vertical bows I knew what to do or when I needed to take them in to a pro shop. With this xbow I just don't know. I'm assuming it's tuneable but I don't even know where to start. If it is a (just move your sights for deer season thing) i am grudgingly good with that. Just looking for experienced advice.

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So you guys are saying that this is kinda normal. Just seems off but I dont know
Its not normal. I believe they can and should be shooting pretty close to where your poi is with field points. There's so many things it can be. Its hard to say if the bow is out of tune. It very well could be. Spine, vanes, nocks, servings, cable slide, bow tune etc....

Process of elimination. As far as timing goes your cams need to be in sinc with each other. Rotating the same when shot. If one is leading the other you will see some poi difference especially with broad heads. Find a reference point and take measurements or eye ball the cams. Compare the orientation of them. They should look to be at rest in the same position as each other.
 

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I grabbed multiple arrows and made multiple shots. At first I thought the blades where opening but the consistency was good. So I taped the blades shut on a rage and it hit left like every other head. With my vertical bows I knew what to do or when I needed to take them in to a pro shop. With this xbow I just don't know. I'm assuming it's tuneable but I don't even know where to start. If it is a (just move your sights for deer season thing) i am grudgingly good with that. Just looking for experienced advice.

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With tuning issues (as you mention them) it's just as important to tune them out as it is to do the same with a vertical bow. The belief that you can simply adjust the point of aim and be good ignores what is going on and invites plenty of downside, dependent on what is causing the issue.
You know this.
Keep in mind that many here have no archery background and following advice that suggest ignoring the problem is asking for problems. As someone with a background in tuning (you) you understand the downsides I suspect, so I wont get into that.

With a crossbow, tuning is dependent on the type of bow.
A compound requires the very same attention to the same details as would be addressed with it's vertical cousin. This is where you start.

After putting the bow in tune (timing, etc) the arrow is to be addressed. For the majority of crossbows, everything comes down to the arrow and there is typically no way to adjust the bow to the arrow and so, the arrow must be tuned to the bow.

In the vertical world, there are two camps for tuning an arrow. One camp adjusts the rest and the other adjusts the spine of the arrow to work with a fixed rest location, which is typically set center shot, just like a crossbow.
Some crossbows are sold with very poor shafts, as to quality and construction and IMO... it is best to simply get rid of the junk and get an arrow that you know is not at question. Attempting to qualify a package arrow takes time and many times ends in the loss of the arrow anyway, so why bother?

Start tuning with a proper arrow that is #1: Sufficient spine rating.
The upside of a crossbow is that (by and large) it is nearly impossible to over spine an arrow. In the rare case where an arrow actually is too stiff, it is very easy to reduce spine by adding head weight. Just like a vertical bow.

#2: Nock tuning or buying an indexed shaft.
You can either follow the nock tuning method or just buy (at a premium) a indexed custom shaft. This process seeks to find the high side (stiff side) of the shaft and place that area at 12 o'clock on the rail, to retard hump backing and insure consistent launch effect.

#3: Once you have addressed #1 & #2 , get a graduated weight set of field points and start paper tuning. Same as a vertical bow. Start at 100 grains and work up the weight range 25 grains at a time. Note the tears and end with whatever head produced the perfect tear. Just like a vertical bow.

By taking the time and doing the work, you will have no need to adjust the scopes point of aim for broadheads.
The broadhead itself is another discussion but obviously not every broadhead will fly the same. Same as vertical bows.
When speaking expandables, you would be hard pressed to find a hand full that suffer aerodynamic issues which would cause radical changes in point of aim. When speaking to fixed heads, you would do well to find a hand full that dont cause changes due to aerodynamic inefficiencies.

The bottom line is that if you do 1-2-3, you will know that whatever you are seeing is the head and not the cause of anything to do with the bow.

I suggest calling Jerry at South Shore archery and getting yourself ahead of the game by getting him to build you some arrows. I suggest the Spynal Tapps with all the $3. tweaks added.
You cant get an arrow that is too good. Only too bad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So I'm using the xx75 shafts. If that helps yall suggestions. I called ten point and was told that my issue is odd but was recommended to move the scope. Man for 700 bucks I figured I'd get better performance that my 250 dollar KI BC 370.

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So I'm using the xx75 shafts. If that helps yall suggestions. I called ten point and was told that my issue is odd but was recommended to move the scope. Man for 700 bucks I figured I'd get better performance that my 250 dollar KI BC 370.

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XX 75 is a solid choice.
Nock tune and check bows mechanics then start the head selection test with paper tuning.

You asked for direction and here you have it twice now.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
380 I'll reseachrch nock tuning. I shot 4 different arrows with multiple expandables and they all hit 6 inches left of field tips. It would have been an arrow damaging group. With these alpha nocks I guess I just turn the nock to check each vane?

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380 I'll reseachrch nock tuning. I shot 4 different arrows with multiple expandables and they all hit 6 inches left of field tips. It would have been an arrow damaging group. With these alpha nocks I guess I just turn the nock to check each vane?

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As you mention, as long as the nock is not glued in, it can be rotated to a different vane.

Another check on the arrow is lay a straight edge between two vanes and along the arrow
shaft. Hold it toward a light source. One is looking for any tiny gaps between the straight
edge and the arrow. Check between every two vanes for this.

Wishing you all the best.
Take care.
 

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380 I'll reseachrch nock tuning. I shot 4 different arrows with multiple expandables and they all hit 6 inches left of field tips. It would have been an arrow damaging group. With these alpha nocks I guess I just turn the nock to check each vane?

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Well you have released a good bit of info here in the highlighted.

If I were you, I would stick with nock tuning (as bunnyrabbit pointed out) and I would 1/2 expect that what you have is good to go, in terms of arrows being consistent. That said.... worth doing just to confirm.
IMO...
If the arrows were that far off (to see benefit from nock tuning) you wouldnt be getting such great groups. The great groups also pretty much eliminate potential aerodynamic failures in the heads themselves.
This scenario (that you relate) speaks directly to the bow itself.

I would suspect the timing (for compound) and tillering (for a recurve) if I was hearing this over a phone, from a customer.
You say 10 point, so I am assuming compound. Timing error is extremely likely.
That said...

A poor spine can replicate timing error as to what you are seeing. Paper will either confirm or eliminate this possibility.
Shoot through paper only after confirming that timing is on. This includes checking timing at rest as well as at full draw.

Great information you are offering. Do your part (checking stuff as described) and you will likely end up with a fine shooting bow, once the culprit is found. Take your time and be patient. If you are unsure about timing, 10 point is on the site regularly. Great people and super customer focused. Check with him/them directly as to timing info.

Good luck! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
So without a press or knowledge how would I get timing corrected? All I have here is bass pro and they tried to sell me the wrong dampening kit.

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