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Looks like this fall I'll start another chapter in my life giving deer hunting in town a try. A friend has killed deer for the past 3 years in town hunting very small woodlots and he's having a fit for me to try it out. This year he's scored a hollow behind several houses between two city streets. Today I picked up around 60 acres from the Board of Commissioners which is two different tracts. This week my friend will be trying to pick up an additional 10 acres joining some land we already have permission to hunt on. I think I have him infatuated with asking permissions so now he's on a roll!;)

Town does have a lot of deer and Ive had people tell me to come get rid of some. They are a plain nuisance to some of the people trying to have scrubs and flowers and the such. Anyway, I guess I'm gonna give it a try and see what it's all about. I just hope I don't shoot one that falls smack dab in the middle of a city street or worse....at somebody's front door steps.:eek:
 

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There's a huge need for it, Gab! I always try to give people respect and educate them as to the good I'm doing....and people like to know I use stuff, or in the case of yotes, they just need to be controled...atleast have some fear put into them, which helps a lot! Try not to loose patience with the sour ones though...they just don't see things the way we do, for various reasons....

It was great the day I had to finish off a very much still alive Canada goose infront of someone's front door!!!! The neighbors right beside watched, unknown to me, as I swung the big buggar over my head till I felt the neck crack......The lady looked a bit discusted, but the dude gave me a big thumbs up and said "good job!" That's typical of the reactions I get, but the positive ones, far out number the negative ones, believe it or not!!! I love 'Kill'n in Ktown!' LOL

Be prepaired as much as possible for dealing with having to finish some critter off litterally in a front yard.....like a knife instead of a firearm.....crossbow could be good also.....just if ya ever knife a buck, stand on the antlers first!! I almost lost an eye to one little fiesty buck that I knifed after it had got whacked by a car. Then my butcher dude told me this little helpfull tid bit. lol

Good luck to ya!!!
 

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My hunting partner and I tried Urban hunting in Parma Ohio, a large suburb of Cleveland. In are first year and on his first outing my partner scored the biggest buck of his life. He had it mounted and it looks àssume! As soon as he harvested the buck he called me at work to come give him a hand dragging it up a steep slope and to the truck. He told me to bring my crossbow and come in quiet because his buck had two equally big brothers. And they had not left yet. While I was driving home to change and get to the site he had already registered the buck and scored a large female as well! They just kept coming out of the woods and onto the properties we had permission to hunt on. Not that day but soon there after I came home early and changed. The off to the site. A nice part about Urban hunting, the site was just 1 1/2 miles from my house. And I scored just after the sun was down a large for for myself. The home owners and their neighbors all thanked us for thinning the herd. We just said it was own pleasure to be of assistance .

Sent from my moto z4 using Tapatalk
 

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Used to hunt in the city limits here in spfd mo. Woods along railroad tracks thru town. Bunch of yuppies moved in and started crying about killing bambi. Fish and game refused to make it illegal to bow hunt in city limits,saying best and safest way to keep deer populations down. City made it illegal to shoot a bh in the city limits. So, I can shoot in the city limits but not a bh. Not legal to hunt deer in Mo. without bh.... I hate yuppies.
 

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Ah....This is right up my alley! If you can do it, it's a no brainer! Some of the biggest bucks I have ever seen grown and reside in and around large urban areas. It doesn't take near as much land as one would think for a small herd to thrive and grow old. I have hunted and shot deer in wood lots that were literally a few hundred yards wide and deep, with houses all around. Needless to say you must know and be careful NOT to be hunting in a safety zone, but it's possible. 30 years ago we dubbed it "Sneak Hunting", even though it was legal by the letter of the law. We surmised that it was just a better idea to sneak in and out as to not be seen by residents and passing folk, as they would undoubtedly l scream bloody murder if they see us hunting "They're Deer". Unfortunately here in Philly and the surrounding counties, most all of my old spots have been built on, bulldozed, posted, purchased, etc. It was nice to not have to drive 4 hours to hunt on a Saturday when you were working all week. I am once again on the prowl for some viable spots in my area to fill the void for when i don't have the time to travel upstate.
 

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Did quite a bit of this a few years back. Live in the Virginia DC Suburbs where there are quite a few small parks and corporate estates surrounded by planned communities with wooded common areas. It makes a nice network of deer corridors. At first it was fun taking a few deer, but I quickly grew tired of all of the interlopers and kids exploring the woodlots, leafblowers, mulch spreaders, and especially suburban landowners continually coming up with an endless list of rules, etc. Was brilliantly set up to take some huge bucks but each time I was about to close the deal some interloper would blow the opportunity on me. Finally had one guy suggest that I shoot from his deck as he always saw a huge buck eating his azaleas. I just couldn’t do it as this deer was pretty much tame. Would much rather be hunting farms and woods for truly wild deer.
 

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I hear ya "ATT". Interloper's are unfortunately a part of urban hunting. The tame deer part though, I have yet to encounter in any of the spots I hunted. Granted these deer weren't as high strung as deer upstate, but they were still pretty decent adversaries. The one thing I did notice that was different, was these deer don't rely on scent checking for danger as much. They have no natural predators here, except for the occasional coyote, which are low in numbers in Philly. They are defintely more conditioned to human scents and will tolerate smells that mountain deer would avoid like the plague.
 

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I am all for urban hunting to cull certain species of wildlife.
Couple of incidents I would like to share.

My B-in-Law took a shot at a rabbit with his vertical compound bow outside his home in a small urban town in Ontario, Canada.
Not only did he miss the rabbit but he lost sight of his arrow as well.

Turned up the next day in a neighbor's outdoor hot tub.
Fortunately no one was in it.

As young teens, a buddy and I got our first aluminum shaft arrows for our recurve vertical bows.
Big $ for us back then, around 1973-76 I'm guessing.
I think they were over $20/each IIRC.

We went to a field that had to be 250-300+ yards square.
I am guesstimating because we used to drive golf balls there as well and were lucky to hit one out of the field.

Anyway, we stood at one end of the field and foolishly decided to see how far the arrows would fly so we launched about 6 of them.
It was a crystal clear blue sky so no luck seeing the aluminum shaft arrows in flight.

As we got closer to the other end of the field, we could see and hear some commotion in a backyard with kids, swings and teeter-totters.
There were our arrows sticking up in the backyard.

Needless to say, we did not pursue retrieving the arrows but high tailed it outta there.

Moral of the story, careful where you are shooting, be aware of your surroundings and expect the unexpected.
Even glancing off a branch or rock, an arrow will carry enough energy to do some serious damage.
 

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The tame deer part though, I have yet to encounter in any of the spots I hunted. Granted these deer weren't as high strung as deer upstate, but they were still pretty decent adversaries. The one thing I did notice that was different, was these deer don't rely on scent checking for danger as much. They have no natural predators here, except for the occasional coyote, which are low in numbers in Philly. They are defintely more conditioned to human scents and will tolerate smells that mountain deer would avoid like the plague.
Will stand behind my tame deer comment. While they are still deer and not like pets (just like a Zebra cannot be a domesticated horse). But they are nowhere near as wary as their farm or big woods cousins. There are many reasons for this. First and foremost is the frequency of human encounters throughout their range, this desensitizes them to human presence in the area. That’s why a guy was regularly seeing a 4 year old 10 pointer eating his azaleas 35 yards away from him sitting on the deck with his coffee and newspaper. I’ve also had two different bucks curiously walk up to about 40 yards away to watch me hanging tree stands. l‘ve also often experienced urban deer coming within 40-50 yards of me while knowing I was there - big woods and farm deer generally don’t do that. However, just like big woods deer if you know there’s a mature buck around keep the pressure there to a minimum prior to pursuing him,

One of the biggest mistakes I see urban hunters make is over hunting an area where they’ve seen a big buck. I found it fairly easy to take a deer or two from unhunted or low pressured urban spots. But after taking a few deer from a given spot the survivors begin to understand there’s a bloodthirsty predator in the area and begin to adapt (mostly moving to the next property). But I’ve still had more urban hunts messed up by interloping humans than deer figuring things out.

Still, the primary thing that pushed me away from urban hunting was dealing with suburban landowners. Occasionally I would find a good one who appreciated my keeping the deer from destroying their landscaping. But more often than not they would want to micro-control my every move - when to come, where to park, how to enter/exit property, what trees I could hang a stand on. This was usually followed by attempts to turn me into an indentured servant, “would you mind cutting the grass, raking the leaves, landscaping.....”

Anyway that was my experience.
 

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Ha! Ha! I agree with you on just about everything you stated ATT. I would defintely draw the line once I was being micro managed. I also agree 100% percent on the over pressuring in these areas, although I believe most of that comes not from individuals, but as a collective of too many hunter's and not enough different urban hunting spots to spread out the pressure. It's like trying to stuff 10lbs of crap in a 5lb bag. LOL!
 

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Gabowman, good luck! I have family hunting in North Ga. and they have some really nice bucks in the subdivision they live in. Here’s a picture they sent me.

1EEB746D-9490-46F9-98DD-83461CF6931D.jpeg
 

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They're 'evolving new camo!!!!!!...turn'n green....! What are they eat'n down there....?
That is moss, silly.
They are all standing still for so long due to covid-19.

In the big city, true urban hunter's wear camo condom's...They are for "sneaky fawker's". :ROFLMAO:
LOL, that is what my Wife calls me when I wear my full camo gear.
"Look, Dad has his camo condom on!"
 

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I have hunted in past years Urban areas around Columbus Ohio, and some around Ft Wayne Indiana. It calls for a little different caution than in the big timber. I am no pro at gearing for it, but one thing to consider is getting than arrow stopped NOW! I would think this is the special time to go for that NAP FOC or maybe a Swat X Mag, both tested accurate and open up big to grab plenty of meat and in the event of a miss that wider opening grabs more slowing and stopping the arrow quicker!

I don't like huge holes and bloodshot front shoulders, but for safety sake, and dropping the animal quicker, I would give up my 1 1/8" cut Viper Tricks if hunting Urban. Anything to contain the arrow quicker, and blow bigger holes would be my first priority in this kind of hunting enviornment.

I have a an idea our own Iron Duke could add a lot here, as this is his forte, working in areas with many folks that are tree huggers and doing what is necessary to keep the peace so to speak, and eliminate the possibility of complaints. Not just making careful kills, but stopping the animal before surrounding home owners would have a chance of seeing wounded, bloody, or dying deer!

But it is rewarding for freezer meat in the Urban zones, scents are more natural from humans, and they have been schooled that just because humans are seen it may not be a threat. good luck and maybe if the area has not been hunted recently, you may just get a crack at a Mooie Grandee
 

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When you hunt herd control, the main purpose is to make things so uncomfortable that they don't dare cross the property line during shooting light. One of my sites is a blind known as "The Black Hole of Death", but it has seen only a 1/2 dozen deer in the last 2 months. My camera is "growing moss on the shutter".;) Hardly worth putting the blind back up.
 

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Where to begin???... I could probably write a dozen pages but I'll just write as things pop into my mind. To begin, always remember non-hunters have valid sensibilities and concerns. You're in their domain, not in the big open, unpopulated woods.
#1. Deer dying on someone's steps? It's a real concern because deer die from a loss of oxygen to the brain, NOT a loss of blood. A well shot deer, right through both lungs, still as about 8 seconds of oxygen left for it's "death run." a heart shot deer up to 15 seconds of oxygen left. Just no way around it other than a tricky spine shot. Be prepared to quickly get your arse out of the tree, get to the deer and drag it out of eyesight. Ladder stands or hang-ons are obviously much better than a climber for getting out of fast. On suburban projects we never use a climber; almost never use them anyway.
#2. This is religious gospel: "DON'T TAKE ANY SHOT THAT YOU'RE NOT 100% SURE IS A SLAM DUNK KILL SHOT!!! As the professional who began teaching me 17 years ago said: "There are no trick shots in deer management." I killed deer with my partner on a small campus, all girls Catholic college filled with activist type teenagers where I put my partner in a tree and I hid with a Ghillie suit on the ground so any death run into sight lines could be instantly addressed...lol In a woods DMP my 100% sure kill is between 5 and 50 yards. Among houses 90% of my kills are within 20 yards and the rest within 25 yards. I think I killed a couple between 25 and 35 but that was almost by accident because it was almost dark and I couldn't be 100% sure of distance.
#3. Arrows & broadheads. FIND THEM ALL!!! after your kill. The last thing you need is a dog or kid stepping on a razor sharp broadhead and getting cut up. Even SEEING an arrow in the ground will send sensitive neighbors into a frenzy. Shooting from an elevated position is almost mandatory so your pass through doesn't wind up in the middle of town or sticking out of the siding in the neighbor's house. I saw a video of a guy's kid killing her first deer from a ground blind and the arrow came out the far side of the deer on a 45° UP angle and must have flown a hundred yards farther away.
#4. I make every effort to "fly under the radar." I strive to avoid camo clothing because it's "alarming" to non-hunters. Particularly urban/suburban sensitive or regular folks who have been bombarded with the PETA, ASPCA, and animal rights doctrine. No sense in making things any harder than they have to be. Warm, dry and QUIET, non-camo clothes are hard to find when it gets a bit chilly. Early season, you don't "need" camo. In winter I carry a common tan or black duffle bag with any camo I need to wear. I also load my gear into a JetSled with a cover and drag it to my stand. Crossbow, backpack, dufflebag, baits, whatever. Once again, it reduces "alarming" visuals for non-hunters.
#5. Blood & gut piles. Use common sense. In many cases we load un-gutted animals and take them somewhere that's out of sight to gut. Un-eviscerated deer are HEAVY, be prepared with a ramp to drag them up to get them into the truck. Hidden in back of the truck is preferred over a visible tow hitch deer carrier. If you CAN gut where you're killing the deer, bring heavy duty leaf bags and dispose of the gut pile in a safe location. It's bad enough when you see locals walking their dogs and the dog gets on a blood trail, the last thing you want is a dog getting into a gut pile in front of a horrified suburban family. That JetSled you brought along is there to avoid long bloody drag lines to your truck. ESPECIALLY when there's snow on the ground. A pint of blood in the snow looks like a slasher horror movie.
#6. Credentials. Any that you have go a long way toward reducing the anxiety of non-hunters who talk to you. It's not the time to be humble. Matter of factly, with a tone of professional, run through your experience and any certification you may have. One sentence, than move on to "only shoot from elevated position, find every arrow, blah, blah, blah. Be prepared to address their concerns about safety and why they should be trusting you to not endanger them or their family. I've never had an adversarial confrontation with a home owner, hiker, biker, jogger, bird watcher, or dog walker. Remember, their fears and concerns are valid TO THEM. You and I may think it's silly to worry about their dog being mistaken for a deer, but it IS one of their fears. Treat it respectfully.

That said, have the local police department programmed into your phone in case you wind up in a confrontational situation. Be polite, calm and "professional" in any confrontation. If you're dealing with someone going retard over the situation just call the police. Inform the police of the situation so they don't walk into a crap storm unprepared. Everything is recorded these days so DON'T get into an argument. Just calmly state you have permission, you're legally entitled to be there. Suppress all the emotion.
#7. The meat. Another concern of killing the deer from the non-hunting public is waste. They're very much okay with it as long as the animal is not going to waste. In any conversation let them know that the meat goes to "food pantries for the less fortunate" or "people who can use the meat." "People who can use the meat" might be your brother-in-law, but the point is that the meat is going to a good cause.
#8. Your purpose. Your purpose is NOT to kill a big buck. Your purpose is to reduce Lyme disease, tree & shrub damage, DVC's, (deer vehicle collisions) and deer related destruction of the ecosystem. THAT's what you say in any discussion with anyone you meet. You're there to target DOES! Antlers are nothing but trouble in deer management. More BS comes with killing a big rack than you can possibly imagine. If you do kill one, STFU!!! Trust me, all the neighborhood hunters will be pissed at you, the local undecided folks will think you aren't helping reduce the herds, even F&W will be ready to bust your chops. I swear, if you knock one down, get it outta there, have it mounted and tell everyone on Facebook or Twitter or whatever social media you're addicted to that you killed it in some big woods somewhere else. Which brings up another point "social media;" stay the frig off of it! Everyone without access is jealous. They'll begrudge your good fortune. Goes back to #4. FLY UNDER THE RADAR!"
#9. I never hunt mornings in tight urban spots. I don't hunt weekends either. Weekends too many people out and about. Mornings are too easy to see you trying to get out of a CF situation like a deer dying 150 yards away in the school parking lot. I hunt evenings and recover the carcasses after dark. I do a lot of it so I use almost no light and a FLIR thermal imager to locate carcasses. IF you don't own or can't afford NODs use as little light as you can after dark. ESPECIALLY if you find the blood trail leads between houses somewhere. You don't want a homeowner shooting you...lol :p More realistically, you don't want homeowners calling the cops about peeping Toms, trespassers or intruders. Police don't like dealing with pissed off or scared locals who vote on the police budget each year. ;) "Fly under the radar."

Okay, that's the first batch of experience.
#10. People think that killing deer in a DMP in neighborhoods is like picking apples. Well that may be true early season for the first couple deer. BUT all deer are programed for survival and they get smart FAST! If you kill one deer out of a group of 6, you just educated the 5 survivors. They'll be harder to kill next trip in. Kill one of that 5 on your bait leverage next time, and now you have 4 living Rhodes scholars of avoiding you and hunters like you. they'll be going nocturnal before you know it. The trick of successful deer herd reduction isn't about how to kill the first deer, it's about how to kill the LAST deer! It's impossible to successfully reduce and maintain a deer herd with archery equipment because of only being able to kill them one at a time. Honestly, it's an exercise in futility because of weapon limitations. Keep that in the back of your mind to suppress disappointment and frustration. If you hunt smart, you can kill quite a few deer. Landowners are impressed by numbers; "it's always about the numbers" to landowners. Doesn't matter if it's a US Navy facility or the guy who owns 173 Pleasant Ave, Anytown USA. My point is you may not REALLY reduce the deer herd, but it will look like you're doing something good. (with proper habitat a deer herd can increase up to 40% per year) You can see how you can kill a lot of deer and still accomplish next to nothing. I know of a DMP that's been living on big numbers for a decade and the ecosystem has not seen an iota of recovery.

I've killed 9 deer and 8 deer in a group a few times with rifles and slug guns. Archery killed 4 a few times, but it's hard. You should practice and train for fast reloads and accurate second shots. (Assuming you're allowed multiple kills) If you're not in a multiple kill situation, never kill a deer in a group. Wait for singles, and you should get a lot of deer from one stand. AND, don't "burn out" a stand. Only hunt it at most every 3rd or 4th day. When you kill one, get down and move it out of your bait spot or kill spot asap so no additional deer see it. Now, if you're only seeing a group "kill the dominant doe first!" Usually she's the biggest female, and it's common that she's the last one into your bait leverage. Kill her and like the Mangalores in "The Fifth Element" movie, the survivors get confused and don't want to "flight." Work your way through the survivors always killing the biggest doe next. Young bucks are stupid, don't bother with them until later hunts.

Any questions just ask. I'll answer them if I can. DMP programs can be a lot of fun and very rewarding if you like the accompanying pressure. Very few shooters can handle it, and fewer still get good at it.
 

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Thought of more ...lol
#11. Big broadheads. I experimented with big 3 inch broadheads trying to limit arrow flight after a pass through. Make it easier to find the arrow and limit the chance for collateral damage. Also thought it might reduce death run distance. Big broadheads DID reduce arrow flight after a pass through. Big broadheads did NOT reduce death runs. I saw zero difference between a 1" Slick Trick, 1-3/4" TruGlo, 2" Spitfire or 3" FOC. Logically there wouldn't be. No matter how big the hole letting the air out of a deer, it's about oxygen remaining in the brain. Hence death runs are inevitable.

What I did see though was "you need a lot of horsepower to run those big heads through a deer." I was shooting them out of a 386fps/426gr/141ke Scorpyd Orion and sensed that the energy was almost marginal on some shots. With no difference in death runs, I'd opt for a smaller broadhead.
#12. Bait leverage. It takes around 3 days for deer to locate a source of bait. It takes about two weeks of daily baiting before they are patterned to be there when you want them there. Bulk bait the first week, then reduce the quantity so that all the bait is gone the next day. You don't want the deer being able to eat all night long anytime they want. You want the bait gone and them coming back on YOUR schedule. Baiting by hand is preferred to baiting with a feeder. Feeders draw attention from the public anyway. Distribute the bait in 5 or six small piles in a 5 or 6 yard circle so one dominant deer doesn't push all the others off your bait.
 
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