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Does any one use wooden bolts in their modern crossbows? I know that they are used in medieval type crossbows and fly pretty well, but how are they in modern bows? Is the modern xbow to powerful for them? do they fly true or not?
 

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DON'T!!!!!

Stay with carbon or aluminum. Modern crossbows in the 175 to 225 lb draw IMHO can destroy wooden shafts..............in your face:eek: Not good. Also, with wooden shafts being very expensive, I see absolutely no reason to consider them for crossbows. JMO
 

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I'm going to respectfully disagree. I have used wooden bolts with good success and never had one fail. I shoot a 150# recurve crossbow @ 185 fps so I don't have experience with a faster crossbow. I made mine from 3/8" hardwood dowels (very inexpensive) from a local lumber yard. I marked mine so that I loaded them with the grain opposite of the string to discourage splitting. They held up great to hundreds of shots. Now, I'm not saying that they couldn't crack or splinter, but so will a carbon bolt if you hit something hard with it and then shoot it again. My thinking is I would rather pull out a few wood splinters than a thousand carbon splinters. Wood bolts have been used in crossbows for only a few thousand years and I'm guessing that the old 300# war crossbows may have put them to the test. Just make sure you find some straight material to make the bolts and check them often for cracks, etc. and you should be fine. Again, I can only recommend them for crossbows up to 150# as I haven't any experience with heavier draw weights but they may hold up just as good with them too. Just my .02 from my personal experience.
 

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grndhntr said:
I'm going to respectfully disagree. I have used wooden bolts with good success and never had one fail. I shoot a 150# recurve crossbow @ 185 fps so I don't have experience with a faster crossbow. I made mine from 3/8" hardwood dowels (very inexpensive) from a local lumber yard. I marked mine so that I loaded them with the grain opposite of the string to discourage splitting. They held up great to hundreds of shots. Now, I'm not saying that they couldn't crack or splinter, but so will a carbon bolt if you hit something hard with it and then shoot it again. My thinking is I would rather pull out a few wood splinters than a thousand carbon splinters. Wood bolts have been used in crossbows for only a few thousand years and I'm guessing that the old 300# war crossbows may have put them to the test. Just make sure you find some straight material to make the bolts and check them often for cracks, etc. and you should be fine. Again, I can only recommend them for crossbows up to 150# as I haven't any experience with heavier draw weights but they may hold up just as good with them too. Just my .02 from my personal experience.
No disrespect,but
I guess it must work for you, and I have never shot an Elk.
But if I were to go after Elk or any very large game animal, I would not be using a recurve xbow at 185 fps with a home made wooden Arrow made from a cheap dowel.
And as you state in another post ,your wood arrows have held up for hundreds of shots with the 150 lb bow.And you have no experience with heavier draw bows,but they may hold up just as good with them too.
Sorry, but I really doubt that they would hold up.
I would not want some one new to cross bows to get the idea to make a few home made wooden arrows and try shooting them in a Stryker at over 400 fps.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
grndhntr said:
I'm going to respectfully disagree. I have used wooden bolts with good success and never had one fail. I shoot a 150# recurve crossbow @ 185 fps so I don't have experience with a faster crossbow. I made mine from 3/8" hardwood dowels (very inexpensive) from a local lumber yard. I marked mine so that I loaded them with the grain opposite of the string to discourage splitting. They held up great to hundreds of shots. Now, I'm not saying that they couldn't crack or splinter, but so will a carbon bolt if you hit something hard with it and then shoot it again. My thinking is I would rather pull out a few wood splinters than a thousand carbon splinters. Wood bolts have been used in crossbows for only a few thousand years and I'm guessing that the old 300# war crossbows may have put them to the test. Just make sure you find some straight material to make the bolts and check them often for cracks, etc. and you should be fine. Again, I can only recommend them for crossbows up to 150# as I haven't any experience with heavier draw weights but they may hold up just as good with them too. Just my .02 from my personal experience.
That's interesting grndhntr. My xbow has a draw of 150Ib and I only shoot at a bag target. I'm wondering if Longbow arrow shafts cut down would be worth a try?

Perhaps if you don't mind you could PM with me info of how you build your wooden bolts? Attaching the head and fletching would be of use. I could show them to a 'Trad' bowman I know and get his advice as well (he along uses wooden arrows in his war bow.
 

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For what it's worth -
I have a reproduction Medieval crossbow. I shoot moderatly expensive, well made, wood arrows out of it.
I also have a few modern crossbows, they get modern material arrows put thru them.

That said, with a 150lb bow, well made, wood arrows is most likely fine. Personally, as unpretty as my face is.....I'd like to keep it splinter free as much as possible. By me...any bow with much over 150lb prod/limbs, would be safer with stronger materials for your arrows.

By the way, and for what it's worth....if you read some of the history, bolts are very short..."mostly" metal projectiles, not the long skinny things we shoot today...made of wood, aluminum and carbon fiber.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Cheers Mike, I'm just so used to calling them bolts that's it's a hard habit to get out of. I'll try and use Arrow instead, even though it feels alien to me.

I guess really I'm looking at making my own arrows and naively figured that wood would work well enough. Although now It's sounding (and after doing some more research) that modern materials would be best if I want to be serious. The problem is finding a supplier in the UK that knows what I would need or is indeed able to supply the relevant materials.
 

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Won't the internet work?
I have two shops sorta near me but as required, I also shop the internet.

I receitly bought a box of six "Cabron Express" arrows from a Pro Bass Shop about 30 miles away.
I could go back and get a box or two of what they sell that's of your liking and send them to you. Not a big deal.

Mike
 

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If that's what you want to do go for it. At least you've read the pros and cons of it. In my neck of the woods I'd say about 90% of the traditional archers use carbon or aluminum shafts for recurves and long bows (vertical). I've had only one shaft to "explode" on release from a 65 lb recurve and I guess if I had checked the arrow out closely I would have seen a problem. I used to buy cedar shafts for $60.00 per hundred:eek: Now wooden shafts are equal in price per dozen as aluminum and some carbons. That would be my main reason for going with a shaft that's more consistent and durable. Let us know how things go with wooden arrows if you go that route.
 

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I still have about twenty of my old port orford cedar shafts for my long bow and recurve. I have a fletching jig, feathers et. al. for making wooden arrows. They are heavier than aluminum or carbon but since I'm not looking for speed I'm not too concerned. I've never considered using a wooden arrow for my crossbow. I wouldn't know where to begin looking for half moon nocks that would glue on to the rear taper.

Also, I swear by feathers versus vanes for my wooden arrows since I'm shooting off the shelf. Moonkryket is dead on about the price of these shafts now... they are expensive.
 

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Hi

I have some input on this, I only have a Barnett compound Ranger 150-180lb so not very powerful and I have used both Wood and Aluminium arrows that I have made. Both fly nice and true, I have never had a wooden arrow splinter on firing or impact, one did break after it went through a car door though.:D

For the Wooden arrows I use 11/32 POC shafts from Quicks, cut them in half then add feather fletching and either screw on 125gr points or 125gr parallel points glued on with Araldite.

For the Aluminium arrows I used Easton XX75 2215 shafts again from Quicks, cut them in half. Glue in a screw insert to both ends, add 2.75" plastifletch fletching and 125gr screw in point.

Aluminium arrows work out at less than half the price of buying from shops or online, and the Wooden arrows are half as much again.

Andrew
 

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All my shop bought arrows are only 15-16" long so are the ones that came with my Xbow. Easton Shafts come at 31" long so give a Xbow arrow of about 16" once you have added a point, they are long enough to fit a broadhead on and clear the end of the bow. Wooden shafts are maybe a bit longer 32", nothing to stop anyone from making them at 20-22" just end up wasting 8-10" of material.

Over here in the UK a doz POC wooden shaft will be about 18 so about $36
doz Cheap Aluminium Easton shafts about 40 - $80, a doz expensive aluminium shafts 200 - $400 dollars and carbons come in at about the same 200 - $ 400 mark so any wastage is costly. The only way it makes any finacial sense to make your own arrows is if you can get two out of the one shaft if not you might aswell buy them, but as with all things there is a certain satisfaction in making them yourself.

Next time I am making some up I will make them at different sizes and see how it affects flight, accuracy and target impact. I could use the offcuts to make arrows for the pistol bow.

Andrew
 

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I have just done some quick calculations and using the cheaper aluminium shafts and only getting one arrow from each is still cheaper than buying ready made.

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'd be interested to know if you use a fletching Jig, Andrew and also what feathers you use for the wooden arrows.

Quicks are a reliable company and if it works out cheaper then I might have to invest in some POC from them.
 

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I also shoot traditional archery recurve and longbows, and within that group many shoot hardwoods such as hickory or ash or even laminated birch. They are super strong shafting and often used by trad bowhunters on their trips to Africa with heavy bows. Just do a web search for hardwood shafts and I'm sure you will find something that will make safe crossbow arrows if that is your desire. Just tell the vendor you want the equal to 2219s and he can figure it out for you. If you shoot flat nocks, and use 11/32 shafts, a fired 9mm pistol case (.355 diameter) could be glued on. To glue nocks or fletching on varnished wood shafts you'll want to use the old standby Dupont Duco cement, or maybe Gorrilla Glue. A hot melt glue is used to attach points. I hope this helps.
 

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Hi Guys ? I'm new to this Forum so I'll be brief and to the point ? I recently viewed a You Tube Video regarding Twig Archery ? I believe the Subject was Crossbow wood Bolts ? Anyway,the guys been manufacturing hardwood Bolts for high end Crossbows like his Excal. Micro 335, he used a 16" bolt Asian Redwood ? Splined at a 26" Scale at .200 to 2.300 Tolerances ? And heat treated on the ends !! He says the Wood bolt quiets down the Bow a lot ? From his Experience ? I have no personal way of knowing that ? But, I do know that hard woods in dowel form ? Especially Cut at 16" with a Outside Diameter of .347 ? I'm assuming since that's about the tolerance for inserting the Bolt into the hold down spring and trigger unit ? If you have any doubts about the strength or density of the type of wood used for the Bolt ? I'm sure there's a way of researching this information by locating logistical Eneneering manuals on materials testing I.e. specifically Hard woods ? So, just to give you an idea of its properties ? Pro's & Con's ?
 

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I guess spine indexing a wooden crossbow arrow may be difficult, if your wanting to keep the grain of the arrow in a certain position to minimize splintering. I don't know, would never try shooting wood arrows out of my xbow. Happy Trails
 

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A 2008 thread. I only recognize a couple of the names.
 
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